blog, Books, copyediting, Uncategorized

What’s So Scary about Scare Quotes and Italics

Photo by Kaboompics .com from Pexels

Welcome to the latest edition of “copyediting adventures!” I had the pleasure of editing a great book with some really interesting content. But there was one tiny flaw. Rather, it was a tiny flaw that turned into a big annoyance: the overuse of emphasis in the manuscript. There were scare quotes and italics everywhere. Multiple words were italicized in a sentence. Some times, one sentence had a combination of italics and quotation marks. There were even words that were italicized, quoted, and underlined simultaneously. This, my friends, is what we call overkill.

As a copyeditor, my job is to make the texts readable while respecting the voice of the writer. But in my experience, some writers don’t understand the power of their own voice. So they try to make the reader see that power. This is a mistake. The fact of your written words is already important enough. To say it another way, if the words are not already important, they should not be in your book.

Sure, writing is a process, and each word should be carefully chosen for clarity, comprehension, and impact. And of course, there are moments when some words need to be emphasized over others. However, if you use too much emphasis, you actually de-emphasize the entire sentence or paragraph.

Everything in the book is already important. But if a reader has to pay attention to every emphasized adverb, preposition, concept, or phrase, then readers will forget to pay attention to the big picture of the book.

So, this is my public service announcement: Too many scare quotes are scary. Excessive use of italics is irrational. Every word in the manuscript should be significant on its own. Just keep writing and let the reader decide their own experience.

—KRW

blog, Writing

Spring Semester 2019

I’ve not paid much attention to my blog of late because I’ve been paying attention to my students. We are about 5 weeks into the semester here, and I’m still trying to get my bearings. However, even though I feel like I am trying to catch a speeding train, I’m having fun.

Funny how that works.

I am teaching a Strategic Communications course, and I love it. The course is geared towards young advertisers, public relations students, and marketers, and it is about studying, pitching, and writing narratives for various products, events, or ideas. The writing style, though, is different. It’s a different kind of storytelling, one that focuses on understanding the nature of branding and people’s response to brands. I’ve never taught a class like this before, but it is shaping up to be the most fun class of the semester.

My other two classes are Technical Writing for Engineers and a general education Rhetoric and Writing course. Tech Writing is always fun and challenging to teach because how do you make writing Usability Reports fun? It’s doable. You just have to be a little crazy.

The gen ed writing course is the one that I have the most experience teaching, and it is proving to be the most challenging. The main reason is that it is a required course. Most students don’t want to be there, and it shows. Since I don’t want to be one of those teachers who lecture, oblivious to their student’s engagement, I’m having to do a bit more work to get the students involved in their own experience.

Trials of a teacher…

How is your year going so far?

-K

blog, Uncategorized, Writing

It’s A New Semester

…And so far, things are going great. I could not sleep at all, so I am operating on less than 3 hours of sleep. I get to class and realize I have no dry-erase markers (ladies and gentlemen, the professor is unprepared for class!), so I run to the store to get some. Then, I get to class, and bring up my Canvas course page and — dun, dun, dun — it’s empty. I put all of the right content in the wrong class. I spent all week doing the wrong thing.

—sigh—

In any case, I have four classes I am teaching — two writing for engineers courses, one strategic communications (writing in advertising and public relations) course, and one traditional rhetoric, research, and writing course. I am excited about all of these course in their own way, but I am most excited about the strategic communications course because it is new. While I have done a bit of freelance copywriting (not much to write home about), it will be interesting to see what I can bring to this course and what I can learn from teaching it.

Onward and forward,

-K

blog

Do You Ask Questions During Your Job Interview?

I have a job interview today for an instructor position at a great university in a great location. In my preparations for the job, I have been trying to anticipate the types of questions the interviewers would ask, and fortunately, it is not too difficult to find a variety of interview questions via a quick Google search. From there, it is not too difficult to get a sense of the kind of questions that interviewers will ask.

While doing my Google search, I started thinking about the tone of a job interview. Interviewees can absolutely set the tone of an interview. In fact, they should. Interviewees should always want to give the impression that he or she wants to actively participate in their working environment. Participating in an interview means anticipating the interview questions and asking questions about the culture of the workplace.

At the end of every interview, there is always that moment when the interviewee has the opportunity to ask questions of their prospective employer. Too many interviewees let the moment pass without asking any questions, and that is not a good idea.

A job is where we will spend a good portion of our day. It is a good idea to know a bit about the company environment before accepting the position. Knowing what questions to ask are important, so while prepping for a job interview, job candidates should take some time to think about what questions they need to ask of the interviewer. These questions can range from how companies evaluate and measure success to what type of challenges a new hire might face.

Here are some of my favorite sites and articles that give great tips and sample questions that interviewees can use:

While there is some overlap in the questions that each article recommends, they all offer great insight into why these questions can help the interviewee know if their prospective employer is a good fit.

In any case, take the time to prepare for the job interview and, most importantly, prepare for the place you are going to spend a good deal of time. Make sure it is somewhere you want to be.

-K